History

In 2006, Ceralink invented a new ultra-fast, energy saving process for lamination of glass and composites, using a radio frequency (RF) press. Ceralink obtained $250,000 of support from the Department of Energy to demonstrate feasibility, perform market research, and patent FastFuse™ technology.  It was determined that FastFuse™ technology has the ability to revolutionize the laminate manufacturing industries through lower capital equipment costs, lower energy costs, faster cycle time and better process flow. 

Through the DOE project, FastFuse™ lamination was established for products including: solar cell lamination, glass to glass lamination (up to 2 ft2), composite lamination (glass to ceramic, glass to polycarbonate), and multilayer composites (up to 5 layers of glass or polycarbonate). These products are used in markets such as transparent armor and shields, photovoltaic panels, auto safety glass, architectural glass, and specialty glass. 

In 2009 Ceralink obtained investment from the New York State Energy and Research Development Authority (NYSERDA) to further develop and commercialize this technology. Currently, FastFuse™ can be used to produce product sizes required in the armor, solar, and specialty markets, up to 6 ft2. The progress to date indicates RF lamination of much larger panels is possible.

FastFuse Timeline:

  • Developed by Ceralink, Patent Pending (2006)
  • DOE Sponsored Initial R&D ($250,000, 2006-2009)
    • Feasibility established for many laminate systems
    • 90+ % energy and time savings validated
    • Several industry contacts established
  • NYSERDA Sponsoring Commercialization ($400,000, 2009- June 2011)
    • Ceralink offers feasibility testing and process development
    • Licensing and/or partnering to commercialize specific applications available
    • General license packaged w/equipment, available through strategic equipment partners
  • Department of Energy- Industrial Grand Challenge ($300,000, August 2010-2011)
    • Partnered with Pilkington to commercialize lamination process for automotive applications
    • Working with University Illinois to develop non-destructive adhesion testing for laminated glass
    • Evaluating the performance of RF laminated products through standardized testing
  • Total Investment to Date - $1.6 Million 2006-2011